In a fog? I provide experience-based solutions to complex problems, and create easy to use products that make your customers happy. From ideation to iteration, these are the processes I use to help you develop great user experiences to meet the needs of your business and delight your customers. 

  • Product owner questionnaire. This lets me scope out the project and give you an informed product proposal. What is the problem that you are solving for? Where are you in the process? Who are the stakeholders? What is the timeframe? Where am I coming into the project?
  • Gather what is known and unknown. Have you done a competitor analysis? What’s out there and working/not working? What influences the space? Who are your most valuable user personas for each user role? Have you done any persona research? What research needs to be done before any design starts?
  • Features list. Before we start laying out the system architect, mapping user flows, or wire framing the product, I’ll work with you to develop your list of known features and the priority level for each one. That will inform what goes into the MVP (minimum viable product), and what will go in future iterations.  
  • Sticky notes, white-boarding and information architecture. Starting the initial design architecture with sticky notes on a wall and/or white-boarding lets us plan out the navigation, buttons, links, and information architecture for the best user experience in a mobile-first to desktop design. Iterating this step, pre-wireframe, -ui and -coding, can save hours and hours of design and developer time, and it helps really focus in on the priority-levels on each screen. View the interactive the HelpMEwell iOS app site map and the Patient User Flow map.
  • Sketching and (in)validating. Pencil and paper roughs using the knowledge from the sticky notes/white-boarding session(s). These are quick and dirty sketches that multiple stakeholders can contribute to – these are NOT works of art. Everyone probably has some vision in their head. Let’s get them out, share what we’re thinking. Different viewpoints can add insight and build understanding across stakeholders.
  • Wireframing. Keeping it in black and white, wireframing your product helps refine the flow and map out the content. At this point we are not adding images or icons, but placeholders to indicate what is needed. We'll also have headers, lorem ipsum text placeholder, buttons, links, and navigation.
  • Ongoing discussions with developers should be happening EARLY so that any considerations that might require extra developer time can be addressed, and adjustments made.
  • Interactive Prototyping. Wireframes are brought into a cloud-based app, set up with hotspots and overlays, and then tested with the stakeholders and users. It enables us to test remotely and get quick actionable feedback to iterate quickly.
  • User Interface (UI) Design. This is where most designers start. But it shouldn’t be. An architect builds an infrastructure before the interior/exterior design covers it up. Product and web app design is the same. Based on your existing brand, or starting from scratch, I’ll work with you on establishing the tone, voice, and library of styles (buttons, font styles, color usage). Discussions will have already happened about this, but now they all come into play.
  • Interactive Prototyping of the User Interface. Just like the wireframing prototype – now we’re testing the full color user interface for images, messaging, interactions of buttons, etc. We’ll test with stakeholders and a small group of users, once again getting actionable feedback to allow us to iterate quickly before handing off to the developers.
  • Working with Developers.  Throughout the design phases, part of my focus is on keeping a clean design so that the hand off is relatively pain-free. CSS will be reviewed and cleaned up before handoff (so that there are not a thousand exceptions to the basic font tags), images and graphics have been sized and optimized for web, interactive elements have been demonstrated or discussed, and specs provided to build the product.
  • Test and iterate the developed product with the dev team.